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What Is Forex Trading?

“Forex” is just one of a number of terms that are used to describe the trading of the world’s various currencies. Foreign Exchange and just plain FX are some other terms used. The Forex market is the largest in the world with an average of $ 3 trillion US is traded on a daily basis.

Most Forex trading is what is considered “speculative trading”; that is buying and selling in the hope of making a profit, rather than doing so for some fundamental business-related need. Only a low percentage of market activity actually represents governments’ and companies’ fundamental currency conversion needs. What follows is a basic introduction to a few of the different types of common Forex trading.

Unlike stock market trading, the Forex market is not conducted by a central exchange. Rather, it is conducted on what is known as the “interbank market”. This is the short-term (often overnight) borrowing and lending between banks, as distinct from a banks’ business with their corporate clients or other financial institutions. The Forex market is considered an OTC or “over the counter” market. This is when trading takes place directly between two parties – whether over the telephone or on electronic networks all over the world- rather than on an exchange.

Over the counter trades can be customised whereas exchange-traded products are often standardised. The main centres for trading are Sydney, Tokyo, London, Frankfurt and New York. Such a worldwide distribution of trading centres across many time zones means that the Forex market never rests; it’s active 24/7.

A currency trade involves the simultaneous buying of one currency and selling of another one. The currency combination used in the trade is called a “cross” (for example, the Euro/US dollar, or the GB pound/Japanese yen.). The most commonly traded currencies are the so-called “majors” – EURUSD (Euro/US dollar), USDJPY (US dollar/Japanese yen) and GBPUSD (British pound/US dollar). The most important Forex market is the “spot market” as it has the largest volume. It is called the “spot market” because all trades are settled immediately, or “on the spot” as it where, which in practice means two banking days.

In the case of what are called “forward outrights”, settlement on the value date selected in the trade means that even though the trade itself is carried out immediately, there is a small interest rate calculation left. This interest rate differential doesn’t usually affect trade considerations unless one plans on holding a position with a large differential over a long period of time. The interest rate differential varies according to the cross being traded. Some interest differentials are fairly insignificant, while others can be quite large.

Margin trading involves buying and selling assets that represent more value than the capital in ones account. A margin deposit is the deposit required when entering into a position as well as to hold an open position. An open position is a position in a currency that has not yet been offset. For example, if someone buys 100,000 USDJPY, they have an open position in USDJPY until it is offset by selling 100,000 USDJPY, which “closes” the position.

Forex trading usually requires only relatively small margin deposits, which is useful since it permits investors to better take advantage of exchange rate fluctuations, which tend to be very small. What this means is someone with a margin of 1.0% can trade up to USD 1,000,000 even though they may only have USD 10,000 in their account. Using this much leverage can enable a savvy investor to profit very quickly, but there is also a greater risk of incurring large losses and even being completely wiped out.

Forex Money Management – Incorporating the 80-20 Rule For Triple Digit Gains

Forex money management is the hardest part of forex trading and most traders simply make errors that doom them to failure. Here we will look at how understanding the 80 / 20 rule and using it in your trading system can make you bigger profits with less risk…

The 80 / 20 rule is simple and states:

That a small number of causes (20%) is responsible for a large percentage (80%) of the effect. The principle was named after the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who noted that 80% of income in Italy was received by just 20% of the population. The value of the Pareto Principle in life and forex trading is – it tells you to focus on the 20 percent of your trading that really matters.

Most traders simply trade too much and the 20% that matters are really just the high odds trades – get rid of the marginal and low odds trades and trade high odds set ups only.

The fact is many traders think the more they trade the better and the more chance they have of enjoying currency trading success. Most try trading the market noise and try forex day trading or scalping – but they are doomed to failure and get wiped out. Trading profits are not correlated to how often you trade, as you are only judged on being right with your trading signal.

If you trade 100 times or twice all that matters is the amount of money you put in the bank from your market timing.

I know traders who trade just a few times a year and make somewhere between 100 – 200% just simply because they wait for high odds trades, hit them and hold them.

Trading less, is more time efficient and more profitable.

Look at any new traders account and they will be over trading and if you make the mistake of taking marginal trades you will lose.

Money management is all about protecting the account equity you a have and if you focus on high odds set ups only, you are going to increase your profit potential overall.

The 80 / 20 rule works in forex trading just as it does in all areas of life and if you use it in forex trading you will focusing on making money and that at the end of the day, is what forex trading is all about.

So think about it, apply it, watch your profits soar and your account equity risk decline and get on the road to currency trading success.

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